Mal J Nutr 23(2): 175 - 189, 2017

Factors Related to Exclusive Breastfeeding among Mothers in the City of Palu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia
Nurdin Rahman*, Nikmah Utami Dewi, Siti Ika Fitrasyah, Bohari, Via Oktaviani & Mohammad Rifai


ABSTRACT

Introduction: The rate of exclusive breastfeeding in Indonesia is still low. In Palu City, Central Sulawesi, exclusive breastfeeding practice in 2014 was only 59.7% which was far below the national target of 80%. This study aimed to assess modifiable potential factors that can promote exclusive breastfeeding among mothers in Palu City.
Methods: A total of 80 mothers with a child over the age of 6-24 months attending the Bulili Health Center were recruited into the study using convenience sampling. For purposes of the study potential factors identified for assessment using a standardised questionnaire were knowledge, attitude, practice, socio-culture, formula milk exposure to commercials, and support from health professionals and family. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were applied.
Results: Young mothers aged 20-35 years made up more than half the sample (57.5%). In terms of education, 42.5% had graduated from junior high school. Almost two-thirds (63.75%) of the mothers were housewives. Only 26.2% of the subjects practised exclusive breastfeeding. The factors related to exclusive breastfeeding (p<0.05) were attitude, practice, socio-culture factors such as religion, culture and, influence of community and formula milk and exposure to commercials. Multivariate analysis indicated that only practice (p=0.000), socio-culture (p=0.002) and exposure to formula milk commercials (p=0.000) were significantly associated with exclusive breastfeeding.
Conclusion: The main modifiable factors that lead to exclusive breastfeeding among mothers in Palu are socio-culture followed by practice and formula milk commercials. Besides promotion of cultural aspects, a definite policy on infant formula commercials is needed to support exclusive breastfeeding.

Keywords: Exclusive breastfeeding, exposure to formula milk commercials, practices, socio-culture

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