Mal J Nutr 23(3): 449-460, 2017

Potential Hypocholesterolemic Activity of Flour from Leaves of Moringa (Moringa oleifera L.)
Indah Asrifah1, Teti Estiasih2* & Hidayat Sujuti3

1 Master Program of Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Brawijaya University
2 Department of Food Science and Technology, Brawijaya University Jalan Veteran, Malang 65145, Indonesia
3 Laboratory of Biochemistry Faculty of Medicine, Brawijaya University, Jalan Veteran, Malang 65145, Indonesia


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Moringa (Moringa oleifera L.) leaves contain phytosterols and dietary fibres which may be beneficial in controlling blood cholesterol levels. This study was aimed at assessing the hypocholesterolemic effect of flour from leaves of M. oleifera L. (MLF) with white and red stalk in rats. Methods: Thirty male rats were divided into 6 groups, comprising a normal group (negative control), a hypercholestrolemic group (positive control) both of which were without MLF feeding, and 4 hypercholesterolemic groups fed MLF for 4 weeks in the following manner: (i) 0.822 mg/g bw/d white stalk (WM); (ii) 0.822 mg/g bw/d red stalk (RM); (iii) 0.02 ml/g bw/d commercial plant stanol ester (FS); and (iv) 0.001 mg/g bw/d ezetimibe (ET). At the end, serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-c), viscosity and pH of digesta, faecal cholesterol, and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analysed. Results: TC levels in the WM, RM, FS and ET groups decreased by 42.0, 48.8, 48.4 and 52.8% respectively, compared to initial levels. The four groups also showed decreases in serum LDL-c levels by 30.3, 39.2, 37.9 and 46.7% respectively, over the feeding period. Faecal cholesterol levels of WM and RM were higher (63.93±1.87 and 90.11±1.77 mg/100 g faeces, respectively) than that of the positive control (51.30±4.03 mg/100 g) after 4 weeks. Conclusion: Flour from moringa leaves of white and red stalk trees showed potential hypocholesterolemic activity in rats.

Keywords: Fecal cholesterol, hypercholesterolemia, moringa, phytosterols

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