Mal J Nutr 23(3): 353-360, 2017

Enteral Feeding of Critical Patients in Juan A Fernandez Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Does it Lead to Protein Deficit and Caloric Excess?
Cardone F1, Alfonso J1, Castaño F1, Antonini M1 & Baccaro F2

1Hospital “Juan A. Fernandez”, Division Alimentacion Y Dietoterapia, Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Hospital “Juan A. Fernandez”, División Terapia Intensiva, Buenos Aires, Argentina


ABSTRACT

Introduction: The critical patient is characterised by an alteration in the function of one or several organs or systems, a situation that may compromise his survival. The purpose of the present study was to deduce if patients who were fed by Enteral Nutrition (NE) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) had a protein deficit combined with caloric overfeeding. Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken between August 2013 and April 2014 in the ICU, Hospital General deAgudos “Juan A. Fernández“, Buenos Aires, Argentina. The energy and protein prescriptions were obtained from medical indications. For the estimation of energy, the recommendations of the American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) of less than 20-25 kcal/kg/day during the acute phase were taken into account. T-test and Mann-Whitney U test for comparison of groups was calculated with significance at p <0.05. Results: This study had a sample of 52 patients.The average daily energy requirements, calculated from the third day of ICU admission, was 1637 kcal (SD +/- 385, CI 95% 1529.8/1744.1), while the mean daily energy delivered was 1726 Kcal (DE +/- 365, IC95% 1624.4/1827.6). All patients had negative Accumulated Protein Balance (APB). Conclusion: The majority of the patients presented with energy over-prescription and protein deficit. Energy overfeeding could lead to an increase in hospital stay, which would further increase health costs.

Keywords: Critical care, enteral feeding, prescription

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